4 Harmful Effects Of Caffeine

4 Harmful Effects Of Caffeine | coffee | General Health Sleuth Journal Special Interests

Whether you consume tea, coffee, sodas, energy drinks, or chocolate, you’re consuming some form of caffeine. This post is not meant to demonize caffeine altogether; in fact, at small amounts, caffeine has certain health benefits. It’s the excess use of caffeine that is an issue, as this compound is highly addictive. [1] Caffeine doesn’t even provide true energy–it is merely a stimulant. Still, there are many who rely on it every day to get them going. Are you one those people? Listen up during this post to find out how caffeine dependency can affect your body and mind.

The Effects of Caffeine

Caffeine affects the body on three levels:

  • Caffeine affects regions in the brain associated with addiction, creating dependency on the substance for an artificial state of energy.
  • Caffeine impacts the entire body with dehydration, and it impairs the digestive system in a number of ways.
  • Caffeine has an especially negative impact on the digestive system.

At the root of caffeine addiction is a physiological dependency that forms within the brain. This is more than a psychological addiction. Caffeine actually makes the brain not only want it, but it makes the brain want it more and more. Here are a few of the side effects that go along with caffeine:

  1. Caffeine and Dependency

Caffeine suppresses a chemical called adenosine, which is secreted by the brain to relax the body. [2] Suppression of this compound by caffeine affects the body by making it feel a tense surge of energy. While this surge of energy is truly stimulating, the threshold of stimulation continues to rise, making the brain require increasing levels of caffeine to simulate the same effect. This creates dependency on users who require caffeine on a daily basis to get moving.

  1. Caffeine and Dehydration

Another negative effect of caffeine is dehydration. Caffeine acts as a natural diuretic, which may be a benefit to individuals dealing with bloating. [3] Coffee and energy drinks are the biggest contributors to dehydration, and, despite a high volume of liquid consumption with these beverages, still contribute to dehydration. Dehydrated cells have difficulty absorbing nutrients, and they also have problems eliminating waste.

  1. Caffeine and Adrenal Exhaustion

Large amounts of caffeine can lead to adrenal exhaustion precipitated by the “rush” that it creates in the body. Adrenal exhaustion is particularly pronounced in children, who are now consuming more caffeine than ever before thanks to soda machines in public schools. The common symptoms of adrenal burnout include: irritability, anxiety, trouble sleeping, hunger fluctuations, mood swings, and lethargy.

  1. Caffeine and Digestion

Perhaps the most damaging impact caffeine has on the body occurs in the digestive system. It blocks the absorption of magnesium, a key mineral that is essential to the colon’s regulation of normal, healthy bowel movements. [4] Coffee itself compounds the problem by acting as a laxative, causing the bowels to move prior to the absorption of water and mineral nutrients. This reinforces body dehydration and malnourishment. Coffee also increases stomach acid levels, and higher acid levels can cause permanent damage to the intestinal lining.

How to Reduce Caffeine Intake

A better way to counter caffeine’s effects is to gradually reduce your intake of coffee and soda and begin replacing them with organic white or green tea (which contains minimal caffeine), organic fruit juice, and distilled water. Supplements that help cleanse the colon, rehydrate cells, and stimulate digestive enzymes are also recommended.

References:

  1. Satel S. Is caffeine addictive?–a review of the literature. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2006;32(4):493-502.
  2. Ribeiro JA, Sebastlao AM. Caffeine and adenosine. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20 Suppl 1:S3-15. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1379.
  3. Maughan RJ, Griffin J. Caffeine ingestion and fluid balance: a review. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2003 Dec;16(6):411-20.
  4. Bergman EA, Massey LK, Wise KJ, Sherrard DJ. Effects of dietary caffeine on renal handling of minerals in adult women. Life Sci. 1990;47(6):567-64.

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About The Author

Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM has studied natural healing methods for over 20 years and now teaches individuals and practitioners all around the world. He no longer sees patients but solely concentrates on spreading the word of health and wellness to the global community. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center, Inc. has earned recognition as one of the largest alternative, natural and organic health resources on the Internet.

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    • Maegan Jones

      Hi Edward,

      My name is Maegan and I work for Healthline, a trusted health resource for more than 60 million people.

      We’ve recently created an informative and interactive graphic that shows the effects of caffeine on the body. I’d like to offer this free resource to The Sleuth Journal to help educate your readers.

      This interactive and medically reviewed graphic provides a quick but in-depth look at how caffeine changes body chemistry. It also has an embeddable code for use on your resources page: http://www.healthline.com/health/caffeine-effects-on-body

      I hope that The Sleuth Journal users find this graphic helpful, and I look forward to discussing how we can continue to mutually make the world a stronger, healthier place!

      All the best,

      Maegan

      Maegan Jones | Content Coordinator
      Healthline
      Your most trusted ally in pursuit of health and well-being