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Licorice Shown To Kill SARS And Other Lethal Viruses

liquorice candy

Licorice has a rich and ancient history of use as a medicine, being rooted in Indian, Chinese, Greek and Egyptian traditions, alike. Technically a legume, related to beans and peas, its sweetness results from the presence of glycyrrhizin, a compound 30-50 times sweeter than sugar. This compound is what gave licorice its name, which derives from the Greek word γλυκύρριζα (glukurrhiza), meaning “sweet” (gluku)  “root” (rrhiza). But glycyrrhizin’s properties don’t end with its sweetness; it is also one of the most powerful antiviral compounds ever studied.

A study on glycyrrhizin’s inhibitory activity against SARS-associated coronovirus published in Lancet in June of 2003, received little mainstream media coverage, despite its profound importance to human health.  Mind you, only a few months before this the World Health Organization issued a press release (April 16, 2003) stating the recent outbreak of lethal Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Asia was caused by the same coronoviruses used in this study. With the world still reeling from global SARS hysteria and “preparedness,” i.e. stockpiling pharmaceuticals like Ribavirin despite their well-known lack of effectiveness, you would think more attention would have been paid to promising research of this kind…

In the groundbreaking Lancet study, titled “Glycyrrhizin, an active component of liquorice roots, and replication of SARS-associated coronavirus,” German researchers summarized their intention in the following manner:

“The [recent] outbreak of SARS warrants the search for antiviral compounds to treat the disease. At present time, no specific treatment has been identified for SARS-associated coronavirus infection.”

And here is what they found:

“We assessed the antiviral potential of ribavirin, 6-azauridine, pyrazofurin, mycophenolic acid, and glycyrrhizin against two clinical isolates of coronavirus (FFM-1 and FFM-2) from patients with SARS admitted to the clinical centre of Frankfurt University, Germany. Of all the compounds, glycyrrhizin was the most active in inhibiting replication of the SARS-associated virus. Our findings suggest that glycyrrhizin should be assessed for treatment of SARS.” [emphasis added]

Licorice’s potent antiviral properties are not limited to SARS-associated coronaviruses, but have also been studied in connection with another epidemic/pandemic capable and potentially lethal virus: influenza.

In an animal study dating all the way back in 1997 and published in the journal Antibacterial Agents and Chemotherapy, titled: “Glycyrrhizin, an active component of licorice roots, reduces morbidity and mortality of mice infected with lethal doses of influenza virus,” researchers found that when mice were administered glycyrrhizin at 10mg/kg body weight (the equivalent of 680 mg for a 150lb adult), they all survived a series of ten 50% lethal injections. The control group, on the other hand, only survived an average of 10.5 days, with no survivors by day 21, the end of the experiment.

Even more remarkable, when the splenic T cells from the glycyrrhizin-treated mice were transferred to mice exposed to the same lethal doses of influenza virus, 100% survived, compared to 0% for the control mice inoculated with naive T cells or splenic B cells and macrophages from glycyrrhizin-treated mice. The researchers discovered that glycyrrhizin’s powerful, life-sparing effects against lethal doses of influenza were a result of the compound increasing interferon gamma production by T cells.

In order to fully understand these findings, we must look at the question of safety first. Licorice is still commonly perceived as a “dangerous herb,” due to its ability to stimulate blood pressure elevations in susceptible individuals when consumed excessively; but considering the relatively higher toxicity of most drugs, this perception must be taken with a grain of sea salt.  On the other hand, it is important to exercise caution when using licorice, or any herb, for medicinal purposes, and ideally obtaining the assistance of a medical herbalist who can work with conventional health practitioners, whenever possible.

In the United States glycyrrhizin is still classified as “Generally Recognized As Safe,” when used as a flavoring agent, but not as a sweetener. It has also been removed from most “licorice” candies, substituted with with the similarly-tasting but taxonomically unrelated anise. In the European Union the recommendation is for people to consume no more than 100 mg a day, which is the equivalent of 50 grams of licorice sweets, and in Japan, where glycyrrhizin is often used as a sugar substitute, a recommended limit is set at 200 mg a day. This should give you a sense for what a commonly considered safe, daily dose is, and puts a 600 mg “therapeutic” dose in perspective.

Also, it is important to consider that even when the glycyrrhizin is isolated and concentrated pharmaceutically, its relative toxicity is extraordinarily low, when compared to antiviral drugs like Ribavirin.

According to the federally mandated Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided by the manufacturers on pharmaceutically extracted glycyrrhizin and the drug Ribavirin, the former is 30 times less toxic than the later (the mouse oral 50% lethal dose is 9818 mg/kg versus 300 mg/kg for Ribavirin).  It is important to understand, also, that when complexed in the whole root or powdered root form, glycyrrhizin will be treated differently by the body. It will be released slower, will have naturally occurring factors which may attenuate adverse effects, and therefore should be considered safer than the MSDS on isolated glycyrrhizin reflects.

Also consider that glycyrrhizin is much cheaper…

A 200 mg dose of Ribavirin from an online discount pharmacy costs approximately 4 dollars.

Let’s take a 1 pound bag of Frontier brand Licorice sticks, which costs $10, and which contains approximately 7% glycyrrhizin or the equivalent of 13,440 milligrams of glycyrrhizin per pound. This is also the equivalent of sixty-seven 200 mg servings.  If I bought sixty-seven 200mg pills of Ribavirin it would cost me 268 dollars. So, that’s 26.8 times the price of the glycyrrhizin found in licorice.  In both cases, the natural compound is approximately 30 times less toxic and less expensive, and let us not forget, in the SARS/licorice study, Ribavirin didn’t even work. So, it is potentially infinitely more effective. Hmmm. I wonder which I would choose if faced with an impending pandemic virus? A drug with low availability, exceedingly high costs and toxicity, and which doesn’t work, versus a time-tested, safe, affordable and highly effective herb?

The reason, of course, why licorice will never be used as an FDA-approved medicine is because it would take at least 800 million dollars of upfront capital to fund the preclinical and human clinical studies necessary to get it to that point.

In the meantime, I encourage everyone to immerse themselves in the first-hand research itself, which we have both lovingly and painstakingly gathered on your behalf. Visit the live reference page on Licorice here, or skim through the remarkable research on Licorice’s potential value in 75 conditions below….

Name Cumulative Knowledge Article Count Focus Articles
Hepatitis C 31 4 focus
Aphthous Ulcer 30 3 focus
Liver Cancer 21 3 focus
Duodenal Ulcer 20 2 focus
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome 20 2 focus
HIV Infections 12 3 focus
Pneumonia 12 2 focus
Cholesterol: Oxidation 10 1 focus
Cytomegalovirus Infections 10 1 focus
Familial Mediterranean Fever 10 1 focus
Gastroduodenal Ulcer 10 1 focus
Helicobacter Pylori Infection 10 2 focus
Hirsutism 10 1 focus
Rosacea 10 1 focus
Testosterone: Too High 10 1 focus
Abdominal Obesity (Midsection Fat) 6 3 focus
Prostate Cancer 4 3 focus
SARS 4 3 focus
Influenza A 3 2 focus
Bleeding: Excessive 2 1 focus
Breast Cancer 2 2 focus
Cervical Cancer 2 2 focus
Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity: Cisplatin 2 1 focus
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 2 1 focus
Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2 2 1 focus
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections 2 2 focus
Hepatitis 2 1 focus
Hepatitis A 2 2 focus
Hepatitis B 2 2 focus
Hypercholesterolemia 2 1 focus
Hypertension 2 1 focus
Inflammation 2 1 focus
Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxicity 2 1 focus
Liver Disease 2 1 focus
Memory Disorders 2 1 focus
Metabolic Syndrome X 2 1 focus
Myocardial Infarction 2 1 focus
Obesity 2 1 focus
Pulmonary Inflammation 2 1 focus
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections 2 2 focus
Spinal Cord Injuries 2 1 focus
Surgery: Oral 2 1 focus
Trigeminal Neuralgia 2 1 focus
Tumors 2 1 focus
Acne 1 1 focus
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome 1 1 focus
Candida Infection 1 1 focus
Candidiasis: Vulvovaginal 1 1 focus
Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity: Doxorubicin 1 1 focus
DNA damage 1 1 focus
Encephalitis: Japanese 1 1 focus
Endometrial Cancer 1 1 focus
Endometriosis 1 1 focus
Estrogen Dominance 1 1 focus
Fibroid Tumor 1 1 focus
Fibroids: Uterine 1 1 focus
Gastric Ulcer 1 1 focus
Heavy Metal Toxicity 1 1 focus
Herpes Zoster 1 1 focus
Herpes: Kaposi-Associated 1 1 focus
Iron Overload 1 1 focus
Iron Poisoning 1 1 focus
Kaposi Disease 1 1 focus
Leiomyoma 1 1 focus
Lung Cancer 1 1 focus
Oxidative Stress 1 1 focus
Periodontitis 1 1 focus
Promyelocytic leukemia 1 1 focus
Rotavirus Infections 1 1 focus
Stomach Cancer 1 1 focus
Tuberculosis 1 1 focus
Gastric Cancer 0 1 focus
HIV: Opportunist Infection. 0 1 focus
Influenza: Human 0 1 focus
Preventing Cavities 0 2 focus

View the Evidence: Substances

A Chinese herbal formula containing Paris polyphylla, Dandelion, Woad, and Licorice appears safe and effective in reducing cytomegalovirus infection activity in pregnant women.

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Pubmed Data : Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. 2000 Apr;20(4):245-7. PMID: 11789257

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Dandelion : CK(86) : AC(30), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Paris polyphylla : CK(10) : AC(1), Woad : CK(21) : AC(3)

Diseases : Cytomegalovirus Infections : CK(85) : AC(33)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291)

A multi antioxidative treatment in chronic hepatitis C virus patients is well tolerated and therapeutic.

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Pubmed Data : J Clin Gastroenterol. 2005 Sep;39(8):737-42. PMID: 16082287

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Alpha-Lipoic Acid : CK(406) : AC(80), Antioxidant formulas : CK(477) : AC(72), Glutathione : CK(61) : AC(17), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Milk Thistle : CK(226) : AC(55), Schisandra : CK(129) : AC(44), Vitamin C : CK(1208) : AC(238), Vitamin E : CK(1288) : AC(227)

Diseases : Hepatitis C : CK(400) : AC(62)

A skin care regimen containing the Licorice compound Licochalcone A was found to be compatible with the sensitive facial skin of patients with rosacea and improved the appearance of persistent facial redness.

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Pubmed Data : Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2009 Nov-Dec;23(6):e23-8. Epub 2009 Sep 18. PMID: 17177744

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Rosacea : CK(175) : AC(21)

Andrographis, Eleutherococcus (Siberian Ginseng), Schisandra and Glycyrrhiza (Licorice) is safe and efficacious in the management of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

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Pubmed Data : Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2008 Aug;33(16):2022-5. PMID: 12809357

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Andrographis : CK(80) : AC(34), Ginseng (Siberian) : CK(138) : AC(29), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Schisandra : CK(129) : AC(44)

Diseases : Familial Mediterranean Fever : CK(11) : AC(2)

Glabridin, a compound found within licorice, inhibits LDL oxidation.

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Pubmed Data : Toxicol Ind Health. 2009 May;25(4-5):321-4. PMID: 19651803

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Cholesterol: Oxidation : CK(467) : AC(98)

Pharmacological Actions : Antioxidants : CK(3535) : AC(1293), Cardioprotective : CK(627) : AC(185)

Glycerrhiza glabra (syn. Licorice) is therapeutic in patients with protracted pulmonary pneumonia.

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Pubmed Data : Lik Sprava. 2001 Sep-Dec;(5-6):123-5. PMID: 11881346

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Pneumonia : CK(339) : AC(41)

Licorce – Safety Study.

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Pubmed Data : J Am Coll Nutr. 2007 Jun;26(3):209-18. PMID: 17634165

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Licorice contains the compound glycyrrhizin which has significantly inhibits HIV replication in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-seropositive patients.

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Pubmed Data : Pathobiology. 2002-2003;70(4):229-36. PMID: 12679601

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : HIV Infections : CK(551) : AC(183)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Licorice may be an effective alternative to the pharmaceutical preparation amlexanox in treating aphthous ulcers.

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Pubmed Data : J Contemp Dent Pract. 2008;9(3):88-98. Epub 2008 Mar 1. PMID: 18335124

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Aphthous Ulcer : CK(131) : AC(13)

Additional Keywords : Natural Substances Versus Drugs : CK(1003) : AC(167), Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Licorice reduces pain and lesion size in recurrent aphthous ulcers.

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Pubmed Data : Gen Dent. 2008 Mar-Apr;56(2):206-10; quiz 211-2, 224. PMID: 18348383

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Aphthous Ulcer : CK(131) : AC(13)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Licorice reduces pain, inflammation and necrosis in aphthous ulcers.

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Pubmed Data : Phytother Res. 2009 Feb;23(2):246-50. PMID: 18853400

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Aphthous Ulcer : CK(131) : AC(13)

Licorice reduces serum testosterone in healthy women.

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Pubmed Data : Steroids. 2004 Oct-Nov;69(11-12):763-6. PMID: 15579328

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Hirsutism : CK(60) : AC(6), Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : CK(289) : AC(28), Testosterone: Too High : CK(60) : AC(6)

Licorice reduces the side effects of spironolactone in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.

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Pubmed Data : Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2007 Mar;131(1):61-7. Epub 2006 Nov 17. PMID: 17113210

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : CK(289) : AC(28)

Additional Keywords : Drug-Plant-Vitamin Synergies : CK(1011) : AC(275)

Licorice reverses duodenal ulceration.

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Pubmed Data : Antiviral Res. 2006 Dec;72(3):242-51. Epub 2006 Jul 14. PMID: 772652

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Duodenal Ulcer : CK(99) : AC(27), Gastroduodenal Ulcer : CK(100) : AC(9)

Licorice reverses duodenal ulceration.

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Pubmed Data : Practitioner. 1975 Dec;215(1290):787-92. PMID: 772652

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Duodenal Ulcer : CK(99) : AC(27)

Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Ulcer Agents : CK(160) : AC(58)

Licorice root extract inhibits adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucosa.

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Pubmed Data : J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Sep 7;125(2):218-23. Epub 2009 Jul 14. PMID: 19607905

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Helicobacter Pylori Infection : CK(294) : AC(61)

Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Bacterial Agents : CK(903) : AC(283)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Long term administration of a licorice extract in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C is effective in preventing liver carcinogenesis.

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Pubmed Data : Cancer. 1997 Apr 15;79(8):1494-500. PMID: 9118029

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Hepatitis C : CK(400) : AC(62), Liver Cancer : CK(758) : AC(265)

Pharmacological Actions : Chemopreventive : CK(1277) : AC(345)

Long term administration of a licorice extract in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C is effective in preventing liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

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Pubmed Data : Oncology. 2002;62 Suppl 1:94-100. PMID: 11868794

Study Type : Human Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Hepatitis C : CK(400) : AC(62), Liver Cancer : CK(758) : AC(265)

Pharmacological Actions : Chemopreventive : CK(1277) : AC(345)

“A glycyrrhizin-containing preparation reduces hepatic steatosis induced by hepatitis C virus protein and iron in mice.”

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Pubmed Data : Liver Int. 2011 Apr ;31(4):552-60. Epub 2011 Feb 15. PMID: 21382166

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Glycyrrhizin : CK(7) : AC(1)

Diseases : Fatty Liver : CK(486) : AC(116), Hepatitis C : CK(400) : AC(62), Iron Poisoning : CK(20) : AC(9), Oxidative Stress : CK(1858) : AC(703)

Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Inflammatory Agents : CK(1159) : AC(412)

A combination of Bacopa, Amla (E. officinalis), Licorice (G. glabra), Indian mango (M. indica) and Clove (S. aromaticum) protect against experimentally-induced cardiac and renal damage.

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Pubmed Data : Phytother Res. 2005 Mar;19(3):216-21. PMID: 15934019

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Amla Fruit : CK(59) : AC(28), Bacopa : CK(47) : AC(18), Clove : CK(91) : AC(46), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Mango : CK(60) : AC(11)

Diseases : Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity: Cisplatin : CK(165) : AC(64), Myocardial Infarction : CK(888) : AC(116)

Pharmacological Actions : Antioxidants : CK(3535) : AC(1293)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

An herbal formula containing Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum and Urtica dioica may dental surgery bleedings.

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Pubmed Data : Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis.2009 Apr;20(3):185-90 PMID: 19657315

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Grape : CK(960) : AC(263), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Nettle : CK(44) : AC(13), Thyme : CK(37) : AC(25)

Diseases : Bleeding: Excessive : CK(2) : AC(1), Surgery: Oral : CK(2) : AC(1)

Glycyrrhizin extract reduces the development of inflammation and tissue injury events associated with spinal cord trauma.

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Pubmed Data : Shock. 2009 Apr;31(4):367-75. PMID: 18665052

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Spinal Cord Injuries : CK(87) : AC(27)

Pharmacological Actions : Anti-Inflammatory Agents : CK(1159) : AC(412)

Glycyrrhizin, a compound extracted from licorice roots, has powerful anti-tumor activity when combined with interleukin-2 immunotherapy.

Click here to see the entire article

Pubmed Data : In Vivo. 1992 Nov-Dec;6(6):589-96. PMID: 1296807

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Tumors : CK(179) : AC(107)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291)

Additional Keywords : Drug-Plant-Vitamin Synergies : CK(1011) : AC(275)

Glycyrrhizin, an active component of licorice roots, protects mice exposed to a lethal amount of influenza virus.

Click here to see the entire article

Pubmed Data : Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 Mar;41(3):551-6. PMID: 9055991

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Influenza A : CK(304) : AC(77)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291)

Additional Keywords : Influenza Virus A2 (H2N2) : CK(2) : AC(1)

Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, has antitumorigenic activities in prostate tumor cells.

Click here to see the entire article

Pubmed Data : J Med Food. 2009 Feb;12(1):8-14. PMID: 19298190

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Beans: All : CK(86) : AC(17), Flavonoids : CK(887) : AC(289), Isoliquiritigenin : CK(7) : AC(6), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Shallot : CK(25) : AC(4), Sprouts : CK(76) : AC(36)

Diseases : Prostate Cancer : CK(961) : AC(288)

Pharmacological Actions : Cell cycle arrest : CK(377) : AC(311), Enzyme Inhibitors : CK(385) : AC(210)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Nutmega (Myristica fragrans), and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting associated with improved memory and learning. activity.

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Pubmed Data : J Med Food. 2006 Summer;9(2):281-3. PMID: 16822217

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Nutmeg : CK(26) : AC(17), Vitamin C : CK(1208) : AC(238)

Diseases : Memory Disorders : CK(211) : AC(63)

Pharmacological Actions : Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor : CK(24) : AC(10)

Licorice ethanolic extract may be effective in preventing and ameliorating diabetes, ameliorating abdominal obesity and preventing hypertension (three facets of metabolic syndrome).

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Pubmed Data : J Nutr. 2003 Nov;133(11):3369-77. PMID: 14608046

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Flavonoids : CK(887) : AC(289), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Abdominal Obesity (Midsection Fat) : CK(330) : AC(55), Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2 : CK(3196) : AC(315), Hypertension : CK(2610) : AC(260), Metabolic Syndrome X : CK(558) : AC(107)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Licorice extract may be effective against SARS-associated virus.

Click here to see the entire article

Pubmed Data : Int Immunopharmacol. 2005 Mar;5(3):571-80. PMID:15683852

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : SARS : CK(13) : AC(11)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291)

Licorice has anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in a mouse experimental model.

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Pubmed Data : Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2006 Jul 7;345(3):1215-23. Epub 2006 May 15. PMID: 16716255

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Inflammation : CK(1001) : AC(341)

Pharmacological Actions : Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Alpha Inhibitor : CK(1005) : AC(351)

Additional Keywords : Lipopolysaccharide : CK(3) : AC(2)

Licorice has hypocholesterolaemic and antioxidant effects.

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Pubmed Data : Mol Nutr Food Res. 2006 Nov;50(11):1080-6. PMID: 17054099

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Flavonoids : CK(887) : AC(289), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Polyphenols : CK(417) : AC(171)

Diseases : Hypercholesterolemia : CK(953) : AC(162)

Pharmacological Actions : Anticholesteremic Agents : CK(689) : AC(141), Antioxidants : CK(3535) : AC(1293)

Licorice is effective in reducing experimentally induced pulmonary inflammation.

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Pubmed Data : Int Immunopharmacol. 2009 Feb;9(2):194-200. Epub 2008 Dec 9. PMID: 19071231

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : CK(270) : AC(43), Pneumonia : CK(339) : AC(41), Pulmonary Inflammation : CK(259) : AC(1)

Additional Keywords : Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Damage : CK(6) : AC(4)

Licorice reduces body fat and modulate blood sugar.

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Pubmed Data : Biol Pharm Bull. 2004 Nov;27(11):1775-8. PMID: 15516721

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Abdominal Obesity (Midsection Fat) : CK(330) : AC(55)

Licorice suppresses abdominal fat accumulation and body weight gain in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

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Pubmed Data : Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2007 Jan;71(1):206-14. Epub 2007 Jan 7. PMID: 17213668

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Abdominal Obesity (Midsection Fat) : CK(330) : AC(55), Obesity : CK(1255) : AC(266)

Liquiritigenin, a flavonoid aglycone from licorice, has a choleretic effect and the ability to induce hepatic phase-II detoxification enzymes.

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Pubmed Data : Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2009 Feb;296(2):G372-81. Epub 2008 Dec 12. PMID: 19074639

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Hepatitis : CK(64) : AC(25), Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxicity : CK(232) : AC(126)

Pharmacological Actions : Cholagogues and Choleretics : CK(51) : AC(10), Phase II Detoxification Enzyme Inducer : CK(64) : AC(32)

The compound found in Licorice known as glycyrrhizin accelerates liver regeneration and recovery from liver damaged in partially hepatectomized rats.

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Pubmed Data : Eur J Pharmacol. 2008 Jan 28;579(1-3):357-64. Epub 2007 Nov 1. PMID: 18022618

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Liver Disease : CK(114) : AC(32)

Additional Keywords : Liver Regeneration : CK(12) : AC(6), Regenerative Substances : CK(39) : AC(17)

The traditional Japanese herbal formula Saiko-Keishi-To controls pain in trigeminal neuralgia in rats.

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Pubmed Data : Masui. 2001 May;50(5):486-90. PMID: 11424461

Study Type : Animal Study

Additional Links

Substances : Bupleurum : CK(6) : AC(3), Chinese Skullcap : CK(103) : AC(62), Cinnamon : CK(142) : AC(63), Ginger : CK(299) : AC(91), Japanese Herbal Formula: Sho-saiko-to : CK(2) : AC(1), Jujube : CK(12) : AC(2), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Peony : CK(54) : AC(12), Pinellia : CK(2) : AC(1)

Diseases : Trigeminal Neuralgia : CK(143) : AC(19)

Pharmacological Actions : Analgesics : CK(374) : AC(80)

“Glycyrrhizin exerts antioxidative effects in H5N1 influenza A virus-infected cells and inhibits virus replication and pro-inflammatory gene expression.”

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Pubmed Data : PLoS One. 2011 ;6(5):e19705. Epub 2011 May 17. PMID: 21611183

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Glycyrrhizin : CK(7) : AC(1)

Diseases : H5N1 Infection : CK(1) : AC(1), Influenza A : CK(304) : AC(77)

Pharmacological Actions : Antioxidants : CK(3535) : AC(1293), Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291), Cell cycle arrest : CK(377) : AC(311), NF-kappaB Inhibitor : CK(597) : AC(404)

A botanical extract inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and suppresses CCL5 in human endometriotic stromal cells.

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Pubmed Data : Biol Reprod. 2009 Aug;81(2):371-7. Epub 2009 Apr 29. PMID: 19403929

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Angelica : CK(73) : AC(28), Boswellia : CK(122) : AC(30), Cinnamon : CK(142) : AC(63), Corydalis Yanhusuo : CK(7) : AC(4), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Peony : CK(54) : AC(12), Red Sage : CK(134) : AC(40)

Diseases : Endometriosis : CK(169) : AC(34)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiproliferative : CK(957) : AC(711), Apoptotic : CK(1421) : AC(1087)

A compound derived from licorice shows promise for the topical treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

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Pubmed Data : Phytother Res. 2008 Dec 9. PMID: 19067381

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Candidiasis: Vulvovaginal : CK(19) : AC(6)

Pharmacological Actions : Antifungal Agents : CK(170) : AC(108)

A flavonoid found within Licorice inhibits cell proliferation in human uterine leiomyoma (fibroid) cells and increases cell arrest.

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Pubmed Data : Reprod Sci. 2008 Jul;15(6):552-8. Epub 2008 May 16. PMID: 18487228

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Fibroid Tumor : CK(31) : AC(11), Fibroids: Uterine : CK(45) : AC(15), Leiomyoma : CK(36) : AC(15)

A licorice extract reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and may prevent and/or treat periodontitis-associated tissue destruction.

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Pubmed Data : J Periodontol. 2008 Sep;79(9):1752-61. PMID: 18771378

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79)

Diseases : Periodontitis : CK(60) : AC(14)

Clove, licorice, mace and cardamom exhibit free radical scavenging, metal chelation and antioxidant activity.

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Pubmed Data : Biofactors. 2007;31(3-4):219-27. PMID: 18997285

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Cardamom : CK(16) : AC(5), Clove : CK(91) : AC(46), Licorice : CK(254) : AC(79), Maca : CK(80) : AC(21)

Diseases : Heavy Metal Toxicity : CK(584) : AC(168), Oxidative Stress : CK(1858) : AC(703)

Pharmacological Actions : Antioxidants : CK(3535) : AC(1293)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Diammonium glycyrrhizin inhibits pseudorabies herpesvirus infection.

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Pubmed Data : Antiviral Res. 2010 Feb ;85(2):346-53. Epub 2009 Oct 30. PMID: 19879899

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Glycyrrhizin : CK(7) : AC(1)

Diseases : Pseudorabies Herpesvirus : CK(1) : AC(1)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291), Apoptotic : CK(1421) : AC(1087)

Additional Keywords : Plant Extracts : CK(3301) : AC(1139)

Glycyrrhizin exhibits antiviral effects agent against Hepatitis C Virus.

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Pubmed Data : J Transl Med. 2011 ;9:112. Epub 2011 Jul 18. PMID: 21762538

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Glycyrrhizin : CK(7) : AC(1)

Diseases : Hepatitis C : CK(400) : AC(62)

Pharmacological Actions : Antiviral Agents : CK(631) : AC(291)

Additional Keywords : Drug Synergy : CK(321) : AC(140)

Glycyrrhizin inhibits highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus-associated adverse cellular changes.

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Pubmed Data : Med Microbiol Immunol. 2010 Nov ;199(4):291-7. Epub 2010 Apr 13. PMID: 20386921

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Additional Links

Substances : Glycyrrhizin : CK(7) : AC(1)

Diseases : H5N1 Infection : CK(1) : AC(1), Influenza A : CK(304) : AC(77)

Pharmacological Actions : Apoptotic : CK(1421) : AC(1087), Interleukin-6 Downregulation : CK(497) : AC(133)


Article Contributed by Sayer Ji, Founder of GreenMedInfo.com.

Sayer Ji is an author, researcher, lecturer, and advisory board member of the National Health Federation. He founded Greenmedinfo.com in 2008 in order to provide the world an open access, evidence-based resource supporting natural and integrative modalities. It is internationally recognized as the largest and most widely referenced health resource of its kind.

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About The Author

Sayer Ji is an author, researcher, lecturer, and advisory board member of the National Health Federation. He founded Greenmedinfo.com in 2008 in order to provide the world an open access, evidence-based resource supporting natural and integrative modalities. It is internationally recognized as the largest and most widely referenced health resource of its kind.

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