Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course

Prepping In Real Life: It is Never Too Late to Change Course | escape-from-fishy-life-background-700x438 | Preparedness\Survival

There is no other way to begin this article than to simply begin.

Back in the day, meaning 2011 and 2012, survivalist preppers were a curiosity. Those of us that chose this journey ended up soldiering their way through a maze of trial and error, amassing supplies and traditional skills that would carry us through the next apocalypse.

Early on, I chose to refer to the next apocalypse as a “disruptive event” and the label stuck.  Whether a natural disaster, economic collapse, or manmade event, it was always my feeling that a broad foundation of self-sufficiency would carry us through the worst of times.

And so it has been for all these years.

Do you ever feel like a fish out of water? If so, you are not alone.

Unfortunately, so many years later, I find that prepping has become an industry filled with bad information, shoddy ethics, and fraud.  I am saddened by all of this, so much so that there are days I want to give it up lest I am caught up in a cycle where raw capitalism supersedes common sense education.

But I digress.

In this newest Backdoor Survival think piece, I would like to challenge you to take a look at yourself and your needs and judge yourself by your own standards and not those of someone else.  I ask you to walk the walk and stay true to your core belief system so that you can become as prepared as you need to be.  No more, and no less.

To help you along, I am including an excerpt from Dan Chiras’ book, Things I Learned Too Late In Life: It’s Never Too Late To Be Who You Might Have Been.  It has helped me a lot, and I hope it helps you, too.

It’s Never too Late to Be Who You Might Have Been

Most of us live two lives: a secret inner life decorated with high ideals and moral principles, and an outer real life in which we often abandon or compromise our morals and ideals, sometimes our most cherished ideals, for the sake of expediency, fitting in, getting by, or hundreds of other flimsy excuses.

In essence, each of us is a complex mixture of who we are and who we’d like to be. No wonder that we’re each a conflicting maze of emotions and ideas and actions.

At a keynote address at a conference at the University of Colorado in the 1990s, a prominent health-food advocate told her audience, “Don’t judge me by my cupboards.” She went on to explain that her children insisted on her buying all kinds of less-than-healthy goodies – cereals loaded with food dyes and, of course, dripping with sugar. All these products violated her beliefs – and teachings — about sound nutrition.

I fully understand and sympathize with her and don’t stand in judgment. All parents know how difficult it is to get our children to eat right. I offer this anecdote, however, as an example of one of many often powerful forces that steer us off the path of being – or becoming — who we really want to be – in this case, our children’s unrelenting and plaintive whining.

This speaker’s proclamation was just one example of how we all live lives nagged by many niggling little white lies – believing in one thing, acting in ways that contradict our beliefs.

Bottom line, however, when all is said and done, we have to judge ourselves by what’s in our cupboards, not by the slogans on the bumper stickers on our cars or the T shirts we wear on weekends.

What we do is who we are. We are not what we believe in but fail to do or be.

The Final Word

When it comes to prepping, talk is cheap. It is the doing that is expensive.  As I learned from Dan’s book, “walking your talk” takes time, energy, money, and commitment.

My wish for all of you is that you continue to walk your talk. Do it your way.  And when in doubt, ask a lot of questions.  If something smells wrong, most likely it is wrong. Go with your gut instincts, instead.

Prepping, and being a survivalist prepper, is hard work so define your needs, and go from there.  Be true to yourself and your moral compass and you can not and will not go astray.

And that, as I like to say, is all I am going to say about that.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!


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About The Author

Gaye Levy, also known as the Survival Woman, grew up and attended school in the Greater Seattle area. After spending many years as an executive in the software industry, she started a specialized accounting practice offering contract CFO work to emerging high tech and service industries. She has now abandoned city life and has moved to a serenely beautiful rural area on an island in NW Washington State. She lives and teaches the principles of a sustainable and self-reliant lifestyle through her website at BackdoorSurvival.com. At Backdoor Survival, Gaye speaks her mind and delivers her message of prepping with optimism and grace, regardless of the uncertain times and mayhem swirling around us.

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