Puigdemont Warns Rajoy Not to Underestimate Catalan Determination

Puigdemont Warns Rajoy Not to Underestimate Catalan Determination | Mariano-Rajoy-Carles-Puigdemont-600x400 | Special Interests World News
Mariano Rajoy, the prime minister of Spain, and Carles Puigdemont, the president of Catalonia [image: La Moncloa/Ariet/Generalitat de Catalunya]
Independence has shown institutional muscle in Barcelona, with the meeting of more than 700 Catalan mayors who will collaborate with the October 1 referendum despite being investigated by the prosecution. Among them the Catalan president, Carles Puigdemont.

The councilors have been received by the President of the Generalitat, Carles Puigdemont, and the mayor of Barcelona, Ada Colau, in support of the municipalist world. Puigdemont has warned Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy of the consequences of “underestimating the strength of the Catalan people.”

Puigdemont has warned Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy of the consequences of “underestimating the strength of the Catalan people.”

Colau, on the other hand, described as “shame” the operations of the Civil Guard where referendum material has been requisitioned in favor of the vote suspended by the Constitutional Court.

Puigdemont wrapped up the Mayors’ meeting at the Palau de la Generalitat after they heard Colau at the Town Hall.

“Today we are all one. We will not take a step back so that we can vote,” said Miquel Buch, mayor of Premià de Mar and president of the Catalan Association of Municipalities (ACM). The Catalan president has not only criticized the Rajoy government, but also charged, “against those who look to the side not to catch the crisis and those who go a step back,” in a veiled reference to the Socialist Workers Party Spanish (PSOE) and to some extent, against the confluences of alternative lefts.

The Catalan president has not only criticized the Rajoy government, but also charged, “against those who look to the side not to catch the crisis and those who go a step back,” in a veiled reference to the Socialist Workers Party Spanish (PSOE) and to some extent, against the confluences of alternative lefts.

The Catalan president not only criticized the Rajoy government, but also charged, “against those who look to the side not to catch the crisis and those who go a step back,” in a veiled reference to the Socialist Workers Party of Spain (PSOE) and to some extent, against the confluences of alternative left movements.

“The central state may have many laws and many bosses, but they do not have the people of Catalonia,” said Puigdemont, who thanked the mayors who “do not feel afraid” and who “do not underestimate the strength of the people of Catalonia and that will go ahead with the referendum that was suspended by the Constitutional Court of Madrid.

Puigdemont was accompanied by his ‘number two’ Oriol Junqueras, much of his Executive and the President of the Parlament, Carme Forcadell.

Before being in Palau, the Mayors were in the Town Hall. There, Colau reinforced the story that for weeks she tried to transmit the pro-independence movement.

“This is not about independence, it is about defending the rights and freedoms of Catalonia,” said the mayor, who has not made any specific invitation on the meaning of the vote in the referendum.

Some of the attendees have already received subpoenas, something that Colau has rejected. “We are here to say that it is a shame to have a state incapable of giving a political answer to political problems, to sit down and talk. Instead, they want to intimidate Mayors and the media,” said Colau.

“The country is plural, there are not any left over here,” Colau said. “We have differences, but we have points in common.

The majority of the Catalans defend the right to decide our future and the most “fundamental rights and freedoms such as freedom of expression,” she added.

For her part, the mayor of Badalona, Dolors Sabater, lamented that “it is not the referendum we wanted,” referring to the impossibility of agreeing with the State, but has claimed that it is “the best referendum that we can agree to with our political system.”

The Plaza de Sant Jaume and the adjacent streets have been filled with people who have wanted to come to greet the mayors and show their support for the referendum.

During the act they have shouted on several occasions “Independence” or “Votaremos”. They have also chanted Els Segadors and songs by Lluís Llach. A large banner reproduces the ballot with which the Generalitat wants to carry out the vote that the Constitutional Court has suspended.

The Palau act was convened by the Association of Municipalities for Independence and the Catalan Association of Municipalities with the aim of rejecting “the judicial persecution of the councilors” who have expressed their support for the October 1 referendum, both entities reported in a press release.

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About The Author

Luis R. Miranda is an award-winning journalist and the founder and editor-in-chief at The Real Agenda. His career spans over 18 years and almost every form of news media. His articles include subjects such as environmentalism, Agenda 21, climate change, geopolitics, globalisation, health, vaccines, food safety, corporate control of governments, immigration and banking cartels, among others. Luis has worked as a news reporter, on-air personality for Live and Live-to-tape news programs. He has also worked as a script writer, producer and co-producer on broadcast news. Read more about Luis.

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