Video Games, Predictive Programming, And The 21st Century Skinner Box

Video Games, Predictive Programming, And The 21st Century Skinner Box | cod-advanced-warfare-header-664x374-460x259 | Predictive Programming Science & Technology Sleuth Journal War Propaganda

By: Rusticus | Stateless Homesteading

Perhaps the most encouraging development in fostering freedom in our modern era is the rise of effective “counter-propaganda” to the machinations of Globalism, the likes of which have (arguably) not been circulated so widely since the pamphleteers of the 16th and 17th Centuries. The digital era has brought rise to propaganda and psychological warfare’s perfect foil: The alternative media’s adoption of open source intelligence analysis.

Open source investigations abound on virtually every subject of Deep Political significance today, and as a result, propaganda can be deconstructed by anyone with an Internet connection. Didn’t know that Ben Affleck was a CIA agent whose handler is Chase Brandon? That information is available to you. Interested in the weaponization of novels, or CDC and Defense Department “assistance” given to big-budget Hollywood disaster flicks? Just point and click.

However, if one were pondering why the first-person shooter they just purchased for their Xbox was laden with pro-war propaganda while simultaneously training the player in reflexive shooting, one might have a more difficult task ahead of them; despite the vast influence of the gaming industry on 21st Century culture, virtually no investigative mettle has been assigned to the task of rooting out Deep State actors within the field.

That is, until today.

Foundations, Think Tanks, and Academia: The Usual Suspects and the Revolving Door

Collusion between video game developers and the Military Industrial Complex has come a long way since Atari’s 1980 tank combat game Battlezone was used by the US Army as a Bradley tank training simulator. It’s come an equally long way since the 1996 creation of “Marine DOOM.” The vector graphics of Yesteryear have given way to ever-increasing polygon counts, the shoot-em-ups of the 2D-gaming era dissipating in a sea of first-person shooters (or FPS games). The US Army, too, has evolved in kind; no longer are such training simulators masquerading as video games aimed merely at enlistees, but the populous at large. In this respect, the Army’s pet project, America’s Army, is the Bradley Tank Simulator’s modern analogue.

Originally published in 2002 (with over 40 iterations released since as of 2015), America’s Army is the brainchild of one Colonel Casey Wardynski. Running on the widely used Unreal Engine, the game is distributed at no cost on multiple platforms; in line with Wardynski’s original vision, the series’ intention is to “[use] computer game technology to provide the public a virtual Soldier experience that was engaging, informative and entertaining.” In other words, a “soldier simulation FPS,” more realistic than its big-budget, Hollywood-esque counterparts.

Some might even characterize it as military training software, somewhat ham-fistedly and morbidly marketed the towards the very teenagers and young men the Army intends to recruit.

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Blogging under the pseudonym of Rusticus, the author and freedom activist operates a website tracing the machinations of the Anglo-American Establishment throughout history while simultaneously documenting the process of creating a truly off-grid homestead. (www.statelesshomesteading.com)


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