Diet Drinks Linked With Heart Disease, Death

Diet Drinks Linked With Heart Disease, Death | diet-coke-460x258 | General Health Toxins
Getty Images

Women who drink the most diet sodas may also be more likely to develop heart disease and even to die, according to a new study published Saturday.

Researchers found women who drank two or more diet drinks a day were 30 percent more likely to have a heart attack or other cardiovascular “event,” and 50 percent more likely to die, than women who rarely touch such drinks.

The findings, being presented at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology, don’t suggest that the drinks themselves are killers. But women who toss back too many diet sodas may be trying to make up for unhealthy habits, experts say.

“Our study suggests an association between higher diet drink consumption and mortality,” said Dr. Ankur Vyas, a cardiovascular disease expert at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic, who led the study.

“It’s not an extreme risk,” he added.

Research has long shown that artificially sweetened drinks are not health drinks. While they may help people avoid more dangerous sugary sodas, studies show they don’t help people lose weight.

Vyas’s team studied nearly 60,000 middle-aged women taking part in a decade-long study of women’s health. They filled out a questionnaire on food and drinks as part of the study, including detailed questions on diet sodas and diet fruit drinks.

After just under nine years, the researchers checked to see what happened to the womens’ health. They found that 8.5 percent of the women who drank two or more diet drinks a day had some sort of heart disease, compared to 6.8 percent of those who drank four or fewer drinks a week and 7.2 percent in those who drank none or just a couple a month.

NamePriceChange%Change
KOThe Coca-Cola Co38.66-0.29-0.74%
CCECoca-Cola Enterprises Inc47.760.911.94%
PEPPepsiCo Inc.83.500.550.66%
DPSDr Pepper Snapple Group Inc54.460.510.95%

  “We only found an association, so we can’t say that diet drinks cause these problems,” Vyas said.

And that’s a fairly low risk, given that heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the United States and is very, very common.

The women who drank the most drinks were also more likely to smoke, to be overweight, to have diabetes and to have high blood pressure, Vyas noted.

 

Source: www.cnbc.com/id/101536768


Subscribe to The Sleuth Journal Newsletter for Daily Articles!


About The Author

The Sleuth Journal is an independent alternative media organization comprised of individuals and groups working to shed the light on truth in government, politics, world and local news, civil liberties, natural health and medicine and other important topics that the mainstream media fails or refuses to expose. This information is being presented to you in an effort for advancement in the understanding of our economic and political corruption and the New World Order. It is our intent to connect, educate, motivate and inspire those who are interested in alerting our fellow humans to the pertinent issues that are affecting our lives and future, each and every day. We are a community of truth-seekers and who share a commitment to action and resistance- to push back against those who wish to suppress and control our lives and take away our God-given freedoms and civil liberties. We bring you real news from around the world, without the synthetics. Together in sharing the truth, we can challenge the abuses of the establishment.

    Related posts