Turkey Coup Attempt: Who Might Be Behind It?

Turkey Coup Attempt: Who Might Be Behind It? | turkey-coup-attempt | World News
Soldiers in the coup attempt surrender Saturday on Istanbul’s Bosphorus Bridge. (image credit: CNN.com)

(The Real Agenda News) All information regarding the coup attempt in Turkey can be considered preliminary at best at this point, which is why all information should be taken with precaution.

The latest accounts say that the Erdogan government has survived the coup, after the population went out to the street. Whether the government has partial or complete control of affairs is yet to be confirmed. The only information that has been checked and found to be true, is that the coup was initiated by the military.

Sectors of the Turkish armed forces rose up to try to seize power in the country and declared martial law.

The Executive tried to quell the revolt and the President of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, called on his supporters to take to the streets to stop the uprising, and the public apparently responded.

It was possible to see how the coup developed on live television, and later how some of the alleged supporters of the coup were being arrested.

The coup seems to have begun around ten o’clock at night when troop transport trucks were stationed at the entrance of the bridges across the Bosphorus Strait in Istanbul and closed to traffic.

Shortly thereafter, in Ankara, armored vehicles and tanks took up positions in the streets and several fighter jets came in low over the capital. A platoon of soldiers and coup leaders addressed the General Staff of Turkey and with the support of aircraft fired from a helicopter to then entered the building to take hostage the chief of staff, Gen. Hulusi Akar.

Everything was developing rapidly and amid great confusion, but overall according to plan with the coup leaders, who, as in previous riots, surrounded several important buildings in the state structure and facilities such as Istanbul’s Airport.

Later, they took control of the public broadcaster TRT where, after cutting the broadcast, those in control made a presenter read a statement in which it was claimed that the Army had seized power due to “threats” facing Turkey and that the government was “incapable of tackling and overcoming”.

Meanwhile, President Erdogan was accused of being a “traitor”. They also announced a curfew across the country, which would temporarily be led by a so-called Peace Council House Group.

Who’s who in the attempted coup in Turkey?

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, took over the government last May, replacing Ahmet Davutoglu, who was forced out by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Yildirim is a man of proven loyalty to the Turkish president, who has accompanied him since his time as mayor of Istanbul in the 1990s until his appointment as prime minister.

The current chief of staff, Hulusi Akar, was appointed to his post in 2015 during the Supreme Military Council, the meeting between the Government groups and the armed forces, which each year decide promotions and expulsions from the Army.

The explanation that makes more sense is the one that says that Erdogan was preparing a plan to reduce the military establishment to take out numerous military members who were contrary to the Turkish rulers.

The greatest merit of Akar has been precisely its low profile during the trials of alleged coup plots that, between 2007 and 2014 decimated the military leadership.

Fethullah Gulen, who lives in self-imposed exile since the military coup of 1997, leads an Islamic community that began to spread in the 1980s into a large network that was affiliated to numerous businessmen and bureaucrats.

Allied with Erdogan during his first ten years at the helm of power, Gulen’s allies infiltrated the judiciary, police and according to some sources partly in the Armed Forces, although in small numbers.

These bureaucrats helped the Islamist government to reduce the power of the military, but Erdogan later turned against his ally, which he accuses of leading a terrorist organization that wants to oust him from power.

Thousands of police, judges and prosecutors allegedly members of the Brotherhood have been expelled from their posts, media and companies taken over by the government.

A state of Confusion

The following 12 to 24 hours will be key to determine who is truly in control in Turkey. In the meantime, the attempted coup has plunged the country and the international community into a state of confusion.

President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, has successfully asked the population to take to the streets to defend the legality with the slogan that “there is no higher power than the power of the people”.

On the side of the putschists there is still no visible head, but a statement on the Turkish Radio and Television:

“To remove obstacles to the rule of law, to end corruption, which has become an issue of national security, to take up the fight against all forms of terrorism, to defend universal human rights without ethnic and religious discrimination, to restore order based on the secular constitution, for a democratic state, we have taken control of the country.”

The world will find out sooner rather than later what kind of outcome Turkey and the region will have to deal with after the coup attempt. Even the military seems to have lost control and in doing so, the coup has failed, it is impossible to know what will happen from now on.

[mailpoet_form id="1"]

About The Author

Luis R. Miranda is an award-winning journalist and the founder and editor-in-chief at The Real Agenda. His career spans over 18 years and almost every form of news media. His articles include subjects such as environmentalism, Agenda 21, climate change, geopolitics, globalisation, health, vaccines, food safety, corporate control of governments, immigration and banking cartels, among others. Luis has worked as a news reporter, on-air personality for Live and Live-to-tape news programs. He has also worked as a script writer, producer and co-producer on broadcast news. Read more about Luis.

Related posts